Cover image for The Bigfoot files
Title:
The Bigfoot files
ISBN:
9781978644380
Edition:
Unabridged.
Physical Description:
7 audio discs (9 hr., 1 min.) ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Compact discs.
Genre:
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Summary:
Twelve-year-old Miranda Cho used to believe in it all, used to love poring over every strange footprint, every stray hair, everything that proved that the world was full of wonders. But that was before her mother's obsession with monsters cost Miranda her friends and her perfect school record, before Miranda found the stack of unopened bills and notices of foreclosure in the silverware drawer. Now the fact that her mom's a cryptozoologist doesn't seem wonderful--it's embarrassing and irresponsible, and it could cost them everything. So Miranda agrees to go on one last creature hunt, determined to use all her scientific know-how to prove to her mother, once and for all, that Bigfoot isn't real. Then her mom will have no choice but to grow up and get a real job--one that will pay the mortgage and allow Miranda to attend the leadership camp of her dreams. But when the trip goes horribly awry, will it be Miranda who's forced to question everything she believes? --
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Summary

From the author of Hour of the Bees comes another captivating story that deftly blurs the line between reality and magic -- and will leave you wondering What if?

The Loch Ness Monster. The Frogman. Bigfoot. Twelve-year-old Miranda Cho used to believe in it all, used to love poring over every strange footprint, every stray hair, everything that proved that the world was full of wonders. But that was before her mother's obsession with monsters cost Miranda her friends and her perfect school record, before Miranda found the stack of unopened bills and notices of foreclosure in the silverware drawer. Now the fact that her mom's a cryptozoologist doesn't seem wonderful -- it's embarrassing and irresponsible, and it could cost them everything. So Miranda agrees to go on one last creature hunt, determined to use all her scientific know-how to prove to her mother, once and for all, that Bigfoot isn't real. Then her mom will have no choice but to grow up and get a real job -- one that will pay the mortgage and allow Miranda to attend the leadership camp of her dreams. But when the trip goes horribly awry, will it be Miranda who's forced to question everything she believes?


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

Eager (Race to the Bottom of the Sea) crafts an appealing novel about 12-year-old Miranda Cho-a straight-A student, compulsive list maker, and unlikely student body president. Her chaotic cryptozoologist mother Kat, the blogger behind the fictional Bigfoot Files blog, lives for the chase, but Miranda is tired of missing school to seek mythical animals. She longs for proof of their existence-or not-all the while hoping that her absent father will return. Tension heightens when Miranda discovers stacks of bills and foreclosure notices that threaten the family's home, not to mention her dream of attending leadership camp in Washington, D.C. Miranda agrees to take one final trip to persuade her mother that fantastical creatures do not exist, but the adventure takes a drastic turn when their van breaks down, and roles reverse in crisis. Eager effectively sketches Miranda's embarrassment about her mother's offbeat ways and her beaten-up "Critter Mobile" (a van with antlers). While the idea of who is the real parent repeats, and some pacing drags, Eager makes a case for belief-in the uncanny, sure, but most of all in the people one loves. Ages 10-14. Agent: Sarah Davies, Greenhouse Literary. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Horn Book Review

Twelve-year-old Miranda Cho is a serious student and science-fair champ. Nobody at school knows she yanks out her hair when she feels overwhelmed, just as nobody knows about Kat, her eccentric single mom, an absentminded cryptozoologist. It was fun to believe in fairies when she was young, but now Miranda finds her mothers beliefs bizarre, embarrassing, andwhen the bills go unpaidterrifying. Miranda channels her anxious perfectionism into an elaborate scheme: shell join Kat on one last Bigfoot hunt and, wielding her scientific know-how, convince Kat to abandon her make-believe pursuits and get a real job. Determined daughter and dreamy mother clash during their increasingly perilous trip to the Olympic National Park rainforest. A spiraling, effusive third-person narration amplifies both the wildness of Mirandas thoughts and the awe-inspiring, almost mystical forest (Miranda saw the forest again for what it was. A tunnel of green, a claustrophobic, lushly green labyrinthwas that its heartbeat she heard now?). Their expedition quickly becomes a survival adventure, complete with potential werebears, fairy villages, and the cave of Bigfoot itself. While the eventual resolution comes too suddenly, this is an engaging yarn that blurs myth and reality. jessica tackett macdonald (c) Copyright 2018. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

A skeptical middle schooler gets more than she bargained for in her own search for Bigfoot.Asian-American Miranda Cho, 12, has big plans, with the lists to prove it. She is student-body president and aims to go to a prestigious leadership camp in Washington, D.C. The only problem is that she is on the verge of losing credits from too many absences. Her mom, Kat, who is also Asian-American, is a cryptozoologista serious one. This means last-minute trips to remote wilderness chasing the next big sighting of Bigfoot with little success. Her anxiety surfacing in a hair-pulling habit, Miranda tries to take her mom's comical eccentricities in stride until she discovers a drawer full of unpaid bills threatening eviction and any possibility of her dreams coming true. Desperate, she plans her own Bigfoot search with her mom with the goal of shaming her into reality and, at the very least, responsible parenting. Very quickly her plans fall through, leading her to question everything. Although Miranda is introduced as the perfect Asian student, Kat acts as a foil and provides conflict enough to allow a fully rounded personality to develop. Eagar has a beautiful way with words. Her complex internal dialogues and descriptors allow readers to visualize, in minute detail, every physical and mental aspect of each character and their current surroundings. However, these skillfully in-depth descriptors often usurp the pace and plot.Unlike the elusive Bigfoot, there is little left to the imagination in this quirky mother-daughter story for studious readers. (Fiction. 11-14) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Having a mother who's a cryptozoologist sounds like fun, but following her childlike whims leaves Miranda feeling like the adult in their single-parent home. Miranda holds herself together by keeping detailed to-do lists, being a perfect student, and pinning her hopes on getting into a competitive summer leadership camp. Miranda is already stressed more than any seventh-grader should be, and her worries skyrocket when she finds a pile of unpaid bills. There's only one thing to do convince Mom that Bigfoot isn't real, so she'll get a real job and start acting like a responsible grownup. To accomplish this, Miranda agrees to go on one more Bigfoot hunt, one guided by scientific methodology and her own itinerary. Eagar continues to show her talents as a writer in her third novel, which is rooted in Miranda's internal struggles. Readers hoping for a zany creature caper should look elsewhere, but those who appreciate introspection will be absorbed by Miranda's circling thoughts, worries, and anger, and what turns out to be an eye-opening adventure marked by danger and the fantastic.--Julia Smith Copyright 2018 Booklist