Cover image for David jumps in
Title:
David jumps in
ISBN:
9781771388450
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 32 cm
Added Author:
Summary:
"On his first day at a brand-new school, David finds himself alone at recess after his classmates race off to their favorite activities. Kids are on the swings, playing soccer and busy with video games. But David has a pocketful of rubber bands for his favorite jump rope game. Can making friends be as easy as a hop, skip and a jump? Told in spare, lyrical prose and beautifully illustrated, Elastic Skip is a celebration of friendship, diversity and inclusion."--
Holds:

Available:*

Library
Material Type
Call Number
Item Available
Copies
Status
Searching...
Book PICTURE BOOK WOO 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book PICTURE BOOK WOO 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book PICTURE BOOK WOO 0 1
Searching...
Searching...
Book PICTURE BOOK WOO 0 1
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

It is David's first day at his brand-new school. He doesn't know anyone. At break time he stands alone and watches the other children enjoying their activities on the playground, from practicing football moves and climbing monkey bars to playing hopscotch and daydreaming in the grass. Bundled deep inside David's pocket is a string of rubber bands, knotted and ready for a game of elastic skip. But will anyone want to play with him?


Author Notes

Alan Woo is an enthusiastic teen-services librarian with the Surrey Public Library. Maggie's Chopsticks, his first picture book, won the Christie Harris Illustrated Children's Literature Prize and was shortlisted for the Chocolate Lily Award. Alan's writing has appeared in Ricepaper and Quills Canadian Poetry Magazine, among other publications. Alan lives in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Graphic designer Katty Maurey has illustrated a number of books for children, including Kyo Maclear's The Specific Ocean and Andrew Larsen's The Man Who Loved Libraries, and has been nominated for the Governor General's Literary Award for Illustration. She lives in Montreal, Quebec.


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2--In a story about finding one's place, Woo presents David, who enters a new school. He wanders the playground, unnoticed, observing children in the schoolyard at their play. "But bundled deep in his pocket:/A string of rubber bands/Knotted and ready/For a game of elastic skip." After much contemplation, David senses a pause in the action. He finds a way to intervene, introduces himself, and invites children to try his game. Woo tells this quiet story in short, lyrical stanzas, with thoughtful descriptions interspersed, as David notices his schoolmates engaging in a variety of activities such as "blowing dandelions into a galaxy of stars." Maurey's (The Specific Ocean) digital illustrations convey these moments of play in a way that feels both old-fashioned and modern. Accompanied by a sans serif font and a contemporary palette, the soft-edged illustrations seem fresh. David is light-skinned with black hair and a cowlick, and the students are diverse in race and ability. An author's note provides a brief description of the game "elastic skip." VERDICT A comforting story and a worthwhile addition to collections in need of more titles about shyness, making friends, and starting in a new place.--Clara Hendricks, Cambridge Public Library, MA


Kirkus Review

A classic game on the playground becomes a vehicle for a young boy to make friends.It is David's first day at his new school. "He didn't know anyone. / He had no friends / To hang out with / Or trade tuna fish sandwiches." As he observes his new surroundings, "bundled up deep in his pocket: / A string of rubber bands [waits] / Knotted and ready / For a game of elastic skip." The recess bell rings, giving David the chance to see what his classmates play. Many of the activities of choice may carry a touch of nostalgia for adult readers, with students playing ring around the rosy, red rover, and hopscotch or skipping rope. As David spends ample time exploring his options, he even finds some kids playing video games, reading, or simply "Blowing dandelions into / A galaxy of stars." Eventually he finds a group of "classmates / Tired of hopscotching / Back and forth / And forth and back." David jumps at the opportunity to offer up his elastic skip, explaining the rules successfully to "create a new playing field" of friends. Maurey is strategic with detail, paring ample use of negative space with soft gradients of pastel color. The result is a whimsical tone that matches the controlled, poetic text. David presents as Asian with classmates diverse both racially and in ability. An author's note follows that briefly touches on the Chinese origins of elastic skip.A gentle tale of courage and friendship. (Picture book. 5-8) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

A child in a new school connects with his schoolmates by sharing a personal and colorful game. David doesn't know anyone at his new school, but in his pocket, he carries what he hopes will be the key to friendship: a string of colorful rubber bands used to play elastic skip. During recess, he walks through the playground, taking in the various activities reading, tag, blowing on dandelions children partake in during their free time. Finally, David timidly approaches a group of girls, inviting them to play his treasured game. Maurey's digital illustrations complement Woo's gentle narrative and make great metaphoric use of the expansive white space, hinting at the loneliness David feels initially. As he connects, a faint glow of color emanates from the children. David's background is not explicit, though in his author's note, Woo explains the ancient Chinese origins of the game, which involves increasingly challenging hops and jumps, and the various names used for it, including Chinese jump rope, jumpsies, and French skipping. A welcome, nuanced addition to the vast cannon of first-day-of-school books.--Jessica Agudelo Copyright 2020 Booklist