Cover image for Mother to son : letters to a Black boy on identity and hope
Title:
Mother to son : letters to a Black boy on identity and hope
ISBN:
9780830832767
Physical Description:
151 pages ; 19 cm
Summary:
""I know this wondrous little person has the potential to change the world-and I want him to know it too." In this collection of powerful letters to her young son, Jasmine Holmes shares about her journey as an African American Christian and what she wants her son to know as he grows and approaches the world as a black man"--
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Summary

Summary

"Wynn is my son. No little boy could be more loved by his parents. Inquisitive, fiercely affectionate, staunchly opinionated, he sees the world through eyes of wonder and has yet to become jaded by society's cruelty. I know he'll grow up with stories of having been made to feel 'other' because of the color of his skin. I want to teach him that, though life's unfair, he still has incomparable value in the eyes of his heavenly Father. I know this wondrous little person has the potential to change the world--and I want him to know it too." In Mother to Son , Jasmine Holmes shares a series of powerful letters to her young son. These are about her journey as an African American Christian and what she wants her son to know as he grows and approaches the world as a black man. Holmes deals head-on with issues ranging from discipleship and marriage to biblical justice. She invites us to read over her shoulder as she reminds Wynn that his identity is firmly planted in the person and work of Jesus Christ, even when the topic is one as emotionally charged as race in America.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

In this debut, writer and blogger Holmes shares a series of letters to her young son Wynn exploring African American culture and evangelical Christianity in particular. Some letters are beautiful expressions of hope and love; others are sad reflections of America's mistreatment and murder of black people. One key theme is the need for balance and transcendence above stereotypes and talking points. In sharing her thoughts, Holmes hopes to spark dialog within the church. "These letters are less about offering a systematic approach for how to think about difficult topics than extending what I hope is a refreshing vision for how to speak about them." As an example, she pens one letter to explain to her son that he is more than his ethnicity, but that his ethnicity definitively matters. Holmes writes with a passion, as well as hopefulness, to both her young son and to the church. VERDICT This sincere, personal account will appeal to parents and church leaders interested in the intersection of social justice and religion. Recommended for all libraries.--Ray Arnett, Anderson, SC