Cover image for Nerp!
Title:
Nerp!
ISBN:
9781454934028
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 x 27 cm
Reading Level:
NP L Lexile
Summary:
What's for dinner? How about skizzle klumps n' gizzardlumps? A hilarious look at mealtime with a pair of persnickety eaters, in the most fun made-up language ever!   Would you like a bite of frizzle frazzle hotchy potch? How about a plate of mushy gushy bloobarsh? NERP, says our hero. Nerpity nerpity nerp! (That's "NO" to you!) With nonsense language and humorously expressive illustrations, this delightfully silly picture book tells the story of two picky eaters-one child, one pet-of indiscriminate species, a multitude of supposedly tasty goodies, and one surprising solution to a familiar childhood situation.  
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Summary

Summary

What's for dinner? How about skizzle klumps n' gizzardlumps? A hilarious look at mealtime with a pair of persnickety eaters, in the most fun made-up language ever!

Would you like a bite of frizzle frazzle hotchy potch ? How about a plate of mushy gushy bloobarsh ? NERP, says our hero. Nerpity nerpity nerp! (That's "NO" to you!) With nonsense language and humorously expressive illustrations, this delightfully silly picture book tells the story of two picky eaters--one child, one pet--of indiscriminate species, a multitude of supposedly tasty goodies, and one surprising solution to a familiar childhood situation.


Author Notes

Sarah Lynne Reul is an illustrator, award-winning 2D animator, and the creator of several books for children, including Allie All Along . Originally from Brooklyn, she now lives just outside of Boston. Visit her online at reuler.com and on Instagram @thereul.


Reviews 2

Horn Book Review

Who would want to eat "yuckaroni smackintosh" or "garble snarfy barfle-crunch"? Certainly not this book's protagonist, a wide-eyed, green-skinned, toddler-sized monster. The story of picky-eater Baby's transformation is told entirely through nonsense-word dialogue ("'Erp?' 'NERP'"), which is easy to figure out in context and lots of fun to say: "Frizzle frazzle hotchy potch!" The monster's parents become increasingly desperate for their little one to eat, placing dish after dish in front of the child. But Baby's tastes are low-brow-and its culinary sights set closer to the floor. Reul cleverly foreshadows the problem's solution from the start, with the book jacket and title page showing the family pet (which looks like a baby-dragon-meets-anteater) recoiling from its food. The illustrations-"digital drawings over photographs of cardboard models"-have dimension and humor; everything takes place in the same room, allowing viewers to better acclimate to the weird-looking creatures and unfamiliar "language." This entertaining book may not similarly convert human picky eaters, but at least they're not being offered "skizzle klumps n' gizzardlumps." Elissa Gershowitz May/June 2020 p.107(c) Copyright 2020. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

A tyrant in a footed, mustard-colored onesie proves that no household is safe from the squeamishly finicky toddler. Once solid food is introduced, it's an uphill battle for supremacy. The tot or the caregiverswho will reign supreme? A parade of gourmet delectables is presented with fanfare, amid appreciative tongue swipes from the equally finicky family pet. Does it matter that the child presents as a green, bipedal iguana or that the pet resembles a reptilian anteater? No! "Nerp" means "NERP!" no matter the species. Who cares that these caregivers have clearly toiled at cooking for hours? Garble snarfy barflecrunch elicits a definitive "NERPITY NERPITY NERPITY NERP!" The surprise payoff will wrinkle a few faces in delighted disgust, but the toddler is happy"Blurp"and the caregivers areresigned. Reul's clever use of nonsensical monster vocabulary plays very well against the expressive green and yellow countenances of her charming and sympathetic characters. Even the scaly pet's personality pops, especially when eying the foul contents of its food bowl. The creativity of the menuboth the names and the neon imagesis half the fun of this homage to dinnertime chaos. Will persnickety children drool after their own "squishalicious" masterpieces? "Yerpetty yerpetty yerpy yerp!" (Picture book. 2-7) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.