Cover image for More deadly than the male : masterpieces from the queens of horror
Title:
More deadly than the male : masterpieces from the queens of horror
ISBN:
9781643130118
Edition:
1st Pegasus Books cloth ed.
Physical Description:
xi, 483 pages ; 24 cm.
Contents:
The transformation / The dark lady / Morton Hall / A ghost story / An engineer's story / Lost in a pyramid, or the mummy's curse / Tom Toothacre's ghost story / Kentucky's ghost / At Chrighton Abbey / The fate of Madam Cabanel / Forewarned, forearmed / The portrait / The shrine of death / The Beckside boggle / The hidden door / Unexplained / Let loose / The cave of the echoes / The yellow wall paper / The mass for the dead / The Tyburn ghost / The duchess at prayer / The vacant lot / An unscientific story / A dissatisfied soul / The readjustment
Summary:
A darkly luminous new anthology collecting the most terrifying horror stories by renowned female authors, presenting anew these forgotten classics to the modern reader. Readers are well aware that Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein: few know how many other tales of terror she created. In addition to Uncle Tom's Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote some surprisingly effective horror stories. The year after Little Women appeared, Louisa May Alcott published one of the first mummy tales. These ladies weren't alone. From the earliest days of Gothic and horror fiction, women were exploring the frontiers of fear, dreaming dark dreams that will still keep you up at night. More Deadly than the Male includes unexpected horror tales by Louisa May Alcott and Harriet Beecher Stowe, and forgotten writers like Mary Cholmondely and Charlotte Riddell, whose work deserves a modern audience. Readers will be drawn in by the familiar names and intrigued by their rare stories. In The Beckside Boggle, Alice Rea brings a common piece of English folklore to hair-raising life, while Helene Blavatsky, best known as the founder of the spiritualist Theosophical Society, conjures up a solid and satisfying ghost story in The Cave of the Echoes. Edith Wharton's great novel The Age of Innocence won her the Pulitzer prize, yet her horror stories are known only to a comparative few. Readers will discover lost and forgotten women who wrote horror every bit as effectively as their male contemporaries. They will learn about their lives and careers, the challenges they faced as women working in a male-dominated field, the way they overcame those challenges, and the way they approached the genre--which was often subtler, more psychological, and more disturbing.--
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Summary

Summary

A darkly luminous new anthology collecting the most terrifying horror stories by renowned female authors, presenting anew these forgotten classics to the modern reader.

Readers are well aware that Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein : few know how many other tales of terror she created. In addition to Uncle Tom's Cabin , Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote some surprisingly effective horror stories. The year after Little Women appeared, Louisa May Alcott published one of the first mummy tales. These ladies weren't alone. From the earliest days of Gothic and horror fiction, women were exploring the frontiers of fear, dreaming dark dreams that will still keep you up at night.

More Deadly than the Male includes unexpected horror tales by Louisa May Alcott and Harriet Beecher Stowe, and forgotten writers like Mary Cholmondely and Charlotte Riddell, whose work deserves a modern audience. Readers will be drawn in by the familiar names and intrigued by their rare stories.

In The Beckside Boggle , Alice Rea brings a common piece of English folklore to hair-raising life, while Helene Blavatsky, best known as the founder of the spiritualist Theosophical Society, paints a picture of A Witch's Den as vivid as any vision conjured up by the great pulp writers. Edith Wharton's great novel The Age of Innocence won her the Pulitzer prize, yet her horror stories are known only to a comparative few.

Readers will discover lost and forgotten women who wrote horror every bit as effectively as their male contemporaries. They will learn about their lives and careers, the challenges they faced as women working in a male-dominated field, the way they overcame those challenges, and the way they approached the genre-which was often subtler, more psychological, and more disturbing.


Author Notes

Graeme Davis began writing for tabletop role-playing games in the early 1980s and went on to work for almost all of the major publishers in that industry as a writer and editor. Among many other credits, he helped develop Games Workshop's blockbuster Warhammer dark-fantasy franchise and the 90s Gothic hit Vampire: The Masquerade. Davis moved into the video games industry in the early 1990s and has created more than forty titles as a writer and game designer. His recent work includes the top-grossing 2012 mobile game Kingdoms of Camelot: Battle for the North and two hit games based on Peter Jackson's movie version of The Hobbit. From 2009 to 2015, Davis was line editor for Colonial Gothic, Rogue Games' conspiracy-horror game set in early America. He worked on eleven titles which earned 4- and 5-star reviews on Amazon.com and elsewhere. This is his first book. He lives in Lafayette, Colorado.


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Few consider authors Louisa May Alcott, Edith Nesbit, and Edith Wharton purveyors of the macabre. But this collection of horror tales by women writers includes these voices alongside many others, presenting a different perspective of the genre. The entries were written between the years 1830 and 1908. Alcott, Nesbit, and Wharton offer stories about a mummy's curse, an ominous funeral mass that foretells a tragedy, and a ghastly praying statue that hides a secret. Very few of the selections are overtly frightening-these are subtle tales that necessitate careful reading in order to be truly appreciated. Among the standouts are Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Tom Toothacre's Ghost Story," in which the teller describes how a fresh coat of paint can eliminate a troublesome spirit; Vernon Lee's "The Hidden Door," in which the main character may be haunted by an evil spirit or by his own guilty conscience; and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wall Paper," an account of madness that contains no supernatural elements yet is among the more horrifying pieces here. VERDICT For those who enjoy in-your-face, blood-and-guts horror, this work won't satisfy. But it will delight those who desire shivery tales of moral ambiguity, subtlety, and psychological dilemma.-Heather M. Campbell, formerly at Philip S. Miller Library, Castle Rock, CO © Copyright 2019. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

The 26 stories in this connoisseur's compilation, all published between 1830 and 1908, are a testament to the role that women writers played in shaping early fantasy and horror fiction. Some selections are long-established classics, among them Mary Shelley's tale of a personality swap, "The Transformation," and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's landmark psychological horror story, "The Yellow Wall-paper." Others are more obscure works from well-known writers, including Louisa May Alcott's "Lost in a Pyramid, or the Mummy's Curse" and Edith Wharton's stunning "The Duchess at Prayer." These are buttressed by "At Chrighton Abbey," a story about a death portent haunting an English manor house, by Mary Elizabeth Braddon, one of several of the book's authors who can claim a full rAcsumAc of renowned weird tales, and "The Beckside Boggle" by Alice Rea, whose name and work will be largely unfamiliar to most readers. Davis (Colonial Horrors) has done thoughtful literary excavation, and the stories he has selected are a trove of fantastic gems. Agent: Philip Turner, Philip Turner Book Productions. (Feb.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

While Mary Shelley and Ann Radcliffe are well-known names from the earliest days of the genre, there were actually many women writing thoughtful, psychologically intense horror in the nineteenth century. Davis (Colonial Horrors, 2017) presents 26 of their stories, many previously lost to history. His introduction contemplates the place of female writers in the genre's history and provides information about each author's personal and publishing life and why he chose each story. The result is a book that is a slice of women's history, an examination of the evolution of horror, and an anthology of entertaining, creepy reads. Famous names in the collection will attract attention, like Louisa May Alcott, but it is the compelling and uneasy work of little-known authors like Eliza Lynn Linton or Mary E. Wilkins Freeman that will captivate readers. Suggest this collection to those who enjoy recent female-driven horror like Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado (2017) or editor Amber Fallon's Fright into Flight anthology (2018), but fans of psychological suspense by best-selling authors like Gillian Flynn will find much to like here too.--Becky Spratford Copyright 2018 Booklist


Table of Contents

Graeme DavisMary Wollstonecraft ShelleyMrs. S. C. HallElizabeth GaskellAda TrevanionAmelia B. EdwardsLouisa May AlcottHarriet Beecher StoweElizabeth Stuart PhelpsMary Elizabeth BraddonEliza Lynn LintonMrs. J. H. RiddellMargaret OliphantLady DilkeAlice ReaVernon LeeMary Louisa MolesworthMary CholmondelyHelena BlavatskyCharlotte Perkins GilmanEdith NesbitEdith WhartonMary E. Wilkins-FreemanLouise J. StrongAnnie Trumbull SlossonMary Austin
Introductionp. ix
The Transformationp. 1
The Dark Ladyp. 19
Morton Hallp. 31
A Ghost Storyp. 69
An Engineer's Storyp. 81
Lost in a Pyramid, or the Mummy's Cursep. 101
Tom Toothacre's Ghost Storyp. 113
Kentucky's Ghostp. 121
At Chrighton Abbeyp. 139
The Fate of Madame Cabanelp. 171
Forewarned, Forearmedp. 187
The Portraitp. 205
The Shrine of Deathp. 243
The Beckside Bogglep. 249
The Hidden Doorp. 265
Unexplainedp. 291
Let Loosep. 339
The Cave of the Echoesp. 357
The Yellow Wall Paperp. 369
The Mass for the Deadp. 387
The Tyburn Ghost by The Countess of Munsterp. 397
The Duchess at Prayerp. 405
The Vacant Lotp. 427
An Unscientific Storyp. 443
A Dissatisfied Soulp. 457
The Readjustmentp. 475
Acknowledgmentsp. 483