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Cover image for I thought my soul would rise and fly : the diary of Patsy, a freed girl
Title:
I thought my soul would rise and fly : the diary of Patsy, a freed girl
ISBN:
9780590849135
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic, c1997.
Physical Description:
202 pages : illustrations, maps, music ; 22 cm.
Reading Level:
Middle School.

820 Lexile.
Summary:
Twelve-year-old Patsy keeps a diary of the ripe but confusing time following the end of the Civil War and the granting of freedom to former slaves.
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Summary

Summary

In this latest addition to the Dear America series, Coretta Scott King Honor-winning author Joyce Hansen presents the inspiring story of Patsy, a freed girl who becomes a great teacher.


Reviews 2

Horn Book Review

Patsy is a freed slave girl who continues to live on the plantation and who learned how to read by listening to lessons given to the master's family. When problems prevent the long-awaited plantation teacher from coming, Patsy begins to teach the alphabet to other plantation workers and discovers her gift for teaching. The diary format reveals Patsy's character and unfolds events in a believable manner. From HORN BOOK 1997, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8‘Set in the days following the Civil War, this novel, written in diary format, traces the thoughts, feeling, and events in the life of 12-year-old Patsy. Like many of the other freed slaves, Patsy remains at Davis Hall plantation to work for her former master for wages. As a joke, she had been given a blank book by Mrs. Davis's niece. Patsy, however, has secretly learned to read and write and now this diary serves as companion as she questions what freedom means, comments on the former slaves as they leave the plantation, wonders what will become of her (a disabled orphan), and writes of her hope to be a teacher. Hansen describes a time not often covered and, in doing so, increases understanding of the Reconstruction period. She never loses sight of the story, however, delivering enough suspense to keep her plot moving. An epilogue, historical note, reproductions of photos, words and music to "Free at Last," a gingerbread recipe, and maps round out the book.‘Barbara Elleman, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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