Cover image for The new peoples : being and becoming metis in North America
Title:
The new peoples : being and becoming metis in North America
ISBN:
9780873514088
Publication Information:
St. Paul, Minn. : Minnesota Historical Society Press, c2000.
Physical Description:
266 p. : illustrations, maps.
General Note:
U.S. ed. originally published: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c1985.
Contents:
Part 1 Metis Origins: Discovery and interpretation: From 'one nation' in the northeast to 'new nation in the northwest: a look at the emergence of the metis (Olive Patricia Dickason) -- Many roads to Red River: Metis genesis in the Great Lakes region, 1680-1815 (Jacqueline Peterson) -- Some questions and perspectives on the problem of metis roots (John E. Foster) -- Part 2 Communities in diversity : The metis and mixed-bloods of Rupert's Land before 1870 (Irene M. Spry) -- Waiting for a day that never comes: the dispossessed metis of Montana (Vern Dusenberry) -- Treaty No.9 and fur trade company families: Northeastern Ontario's halfbreeds, Indians, petitioners and metis (John S. Long) -- Grande Cache: The historic development of an indigenous Alberta metis population (Trudy Nicks and Kenneth Morgan) -- Part 3 Diasporas and questions of identity : 'Unacquainted with the laws of the civilized world' : American attitudes toward the metis communities in the Old Northwest (R. David Edmunds) -- Diverging identities : The Presbyterian metis of St. Gabriel Street, Montreal (Jennifer S.H. Brown) -- -- 'What if Mama is an Indian?' : The cultural ambivalence of the Alexander Ross family (Sylvia Van Kirk) -- Part 4 Cultural live : In search of metis art (Ted J. Brasser) -- What is Michif? : Language in the metis tradition (John C. Crawford.
Added Corporate Author:
Summary:
A collection of essays on the Metis Native americans by various authors.
Holds:

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Summary

Summary

This is the first major work to explore in a North American context the dimensions and meanings of a process fundamental to the European invasion and colonisation of the western hemisphere: the intermingling of European and Native American peoples. This book is not about racial mixture, however, but rather about ethnogenesis -- about how new peoples, new ethnicities, and new nationalities come into being.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

The emergence of a new culture group in modern times provides new insights into the difficulties faced by peoples whose ancestry, by the accident of historical circumstance, crosses racial and cultural lines. In 1982, the Metis of Canada were officially declared an aboriginal population. In 1885, a rebellion by the Metis of the Red River region of Northwest Canada was subdued and the dream of self-government was shattered. Coincidentally, numerous publications, museums, and governmental units have used the 100-year anniversary as a catalyst for providing more information about this interesting group. The Metis are a mixed-blood population resulting from the mating of Chippewa, Ojibwa, and Cree women with the European fur traders-predominantly French. In the Northwest Territories, Metis tended to identify themselves as being a discrete cultural entity. This significant collection consists of 12 papers that were presented at the Newberry Library in Chicago in 1981. The reader is treated to a geographical, historical, political, and sociocultural analysis of the phenomenon of ethnogenesis. The volume contains extensive documentation by each authoritative contributor as well as maps, photographs, and plates. Highly recommended for scholars and students at the upper-division undergraduate level and above concerned with cross-cultural interaction.-N.C. Greenberg, Western Michigan University


Table of Contents

Marcel GiraudOlive Patricia DickasonJacqueline PetersonJohn E. FosterIrene M. SpryVerne DusenberryJohn S. LongTrudy Nicks and Kenneth MorganR. David EdmundsJennifer S.H. BrownSylvia Van KirkTed J. BrasserJohn C. CrawfordRobert K. Thomas
Illustrationsp. ix
Forewordp. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xv
Introductionp. 3
Part I Metis Origins: Discovery and Interpretation
From "One Nation" in the Northeast to "New Nation" in the Northwest: A look at the emergence of the metisp. 19
Many roads to Red River: Metis genesis in the Great Lakes region, 1680-1815p. 37
Some questions and perspectives on the problem of metis rootsp. 73
Part II Communities in Diversity
The metis and mixed-bloods of Rupert's Land before 1870p. 95
Waiting for a day that never comes: The dispossessed metis of Montanap. 119
Treaty No. 9 and fur trade company families: Northeastern Ontario's halfbreeds, Indians, petitioners and metisp. 137
Grande Cache: The historic development of an indigenous Alberta metis populationp. 163
Part III Diasporas and Questions of Identity
"Unacquainted with the laws of the civilized world": American attitudes toward the metis communities in the Old Northwestp. 185
Diverging identities: The Presbyterian metis of St. Gabriel Street, Montrealp. 195
"What if Mama is an Indian?": The cultural ambivalence of the Alexander Ross familyp. 207
Part IV Cultural Life
In search of metis artp. 221
What is Michif?: Language in the metis traditionp. 231
Afterwordp. 243
Contributorsp. 253
Indexp. 256