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Cover image for The daring escape of Ellen Craft
Title:
The daring escape of Ellen Craft
ISBN:
9780876144626

9780876147870
Publication Information:
Minneapolis, MN : Carolrhoda Books, c2002.
Physical Description:
48 p. : color illustrations.
Reading Level:
570 L Lexile
Personal Subject:

Added Author:
Holds:

Available:*

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Book J 921 CRAFT 1 1
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Summary

Summary

Tells of the daring escape of a slave couple in 1848, with the woman, Ellen Croft, posing as a white man, and her husband posing as the man's slave.


Summary

On December 21, 1848, Ellen Craft and her husband, William, slipped out into the cold, dark night and took their first steps towards freedom. They were runaway slaves. Posing as a white man traveling with a slave, Ellen courageously boarded a train bound for Philadelphia. Could they actually make it a thousand miles without being discovered? As each tension-filled day passed and freedom got closer, Ellen and William risked everything - even death - to be free.


Reviews 6

School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-Ellen and William Craft were slaves determined to escape to freedom. Their daring plan involved Ellen traveling as a white male slave master with William as her slave. Risking everything, they embarked on their journey from Georgia on December 21, 1848. The difficult trip ended with the couple arriving safely in Philadelphia on Christmas Day. This account of a real event employs a suspenseful text that will keep readers engaged to the very end. A note explains that the dialogue was "taken or adapted from conversations reported by William Craft" in his 1860 narrative. Soft watercolor paintings illustrate almost every page and there are reproductions of a period drawing and photograph of Ellen Craft. An afterword explains what happened to the couple after their escape and mentions William Craft's book on the subject. A great nonfiction choice for newly independent readers.-Pamela K. Bomboy, Chesterfield County Public Schools, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

This easy-to-read account of William and Ellen CraftÆs escape from slavery is simply told yet informative. Light-skinned Ellen disguises herself as a white man, and her husband pretends to be her slave. They travel from Georgia to Philadelphia and freedom. Though awkwardly rendered, the color illustrations help to clarify the text. An afterword and timeline are appended. Bib. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

In clear, straightforward prose, Moore tells the amazing story of William and Ellen Craft and their escape from slavery. This tale is a familiar one to those who study African-American history and the many fascinating stories of slave resistance. But many children will be hearing it for the first time. Ellen and William longed for freedom. Ellen wishes to start a family with William but cannot bear the thought of having a child sold away the way she was taken from her own mother. The two of them come up with a daring plan for escape: light-skinned Ellen will pretend to be a slaveowner and William will be her slave. Together they travel the miles to Philadelphia and eventually to their freedom. New readers will appreciate the fast-paced adventure, simple language, large typeface with plenty of space for detailed illustrations, and a relatively obscure story set in a familiar historical time. Though this series is written for new readers, Moore manages to include some difficult and important angles to the adventure. She allows the young reader to see clearly the differences between the way William has to live as he travels as a slave and how Ellen, posing as a white man, lives. At the climax of the story, Ellen and William are nearly stopped by a railroad officer who demands that Ellen show proof of ownership. Ellen "did something a slave could never do. She stood up for her rights." Young readers will be inspired by this tale of personal courage in the face of prejudice. The author's afterword, timeline, and bibliography add historical insight. (Biography. 6-10)


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-Ellen and William Craft were slaves determined to escape to freedom. Their daring plan involved Ellen traveling as a white male slave master with William as her slave. Risking everything, they embarked on their journey from Georgia on December 21, 1848. The difficult trip ended with the couple arriving safely in Philadelphia on Christmas Day. This account of a real event employs a suspenseful text that will keep readers engaged to the very end. A note explains that the dialogue was "taken or adapted from conversations reported by William Craft" in his 1860 narrative. Soft watercolor paintings illustrate almost every page and there are reproductions of a period drawing and photograph of Ellen Craft. An afterword explains what happened to the couple after their escape and mentions William Craft's book on the subject. A great nonfiction choice for newly independent readers.-Pamela K. Bomboy, Chesterfield County Public Schools, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

This easy-to-read account of William and Ellen CraftÆs escape from slavery is simply told yet informative. Light-skinned Ellen disguises herself as a white man, and her husband pretends to be her slave. They travel from Georgia to Philadelphia and freedom. Though awkwardly rendered, the color illustrations help to clarify the text. An afterword and timeline are appended. Bib. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

In clear, straightforward prose, Moore tells the amazing story of William and Ellen Craft and their escape from slavery. This tale is a familiar one to those who study African-American history and the many fascinating stories of slave resistance. But many children will be hearing it for the first time. Ellen and William longed for freedom. Ellen wishes to start a family with William but cannot bear the thought of having a child sold away the way she was taken from her own mother. The two of them come up with a daring plan for escape: light-skinned Ellen will pretend to be a slaveowner and William will be her slave. Together they travel the miles to Philadelphia and eventually to their freedom. New readers will appreciate the fast-paced adventure, simple language, large typeface with plenty of space for detailed illustrations, and a relatively obscure story set in a familiar historical time. Though this series is written for new readers, Moore manages to include some difficult and important angles to the adventure. She allows the young reader to see clearly the differences between the way William has to live as he travels as a slave and how Ellen, posing as a white man, lives. At the climax of the story, Ellen and William are nearly stopped by a railroad officer who demands that Ellen show proof of ownership. Ellen "did something a slave could never do. She stood up for her rights." Young readers will be inspired by this tale of personal courage in the face of prejudice. The author's afterword, timeline, and bibliography add historical insight. (Biography. 6-10)


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