Cover image for A new Barker in the house
Title:
A new Barker in the house
ISBN:
9780399238659
Publication Information:
New York : G.P. Putnam's Sons, c2002.
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : color illustrations.
Series:
Reading Level:
AD 240 L Lexile
Summary:
Twins Moffie and Morgie are excited when they hear that their family is adopting a three-year-old Hispanic boy.
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Summary

Summary

The Barker twins, Morgie and Moffie, meet their adopted brother, Marcos, in this wonderful sequel to Meet the Barkers. But Marcos isn't a baby-he's three years old, and he only speaks Spanish. As Marcos plays dollies with Moffie and dinosaurs with Morgie, he's a little bewildered until he gets the twins to understand what he likes to play. As Marcos learns some English, the twins quickly learn some Spanish words and phrases. Soon enough it's clear that with a new Barker in the house, the Barkers are a very happy familia!


Author Notes

Tomie dePaola was born in Meriden, Connecticut on September 15, 1934. He received a B.F.A. from Pratt Institute in 1956, a M.F.A. from California College of Arts and Crafts in 1969, and a doctoral equivalency from Lone Mountain College in 1970.

He has written and/or illustrated more than 200 books including 26 Fairmount Avenue, Strega Nona, and Meet the Barkers. He has received numerous awards for his work including the Caldecott Honor Award, the Newbery Honor Award and the New Hampshire Governor's Arts Award of Living Treasure. His murals and paintings can be seen in many churches and monasteries throughout New England. He has designed greeting cards, magazine and record album covers, and theater sets. His work is shown in galleries and museums.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 5

Publisher's Weekly Review

When they adopt Marcos, a Spanish-speaking toddler, the Barkers become bilingual in the latest addition to Tomie dePaola's popular series A New Barker in the House. The youngsters engage in various activities, with thought balloons describing the English and Spanish words. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

In this second book about the Barkers, twin dogs Morgie and Moffie welcome their adopted brother, Marcos, but it takes time to adjust to one another. DePaola's illustrations are sunny and expressive; full-page pictures combine with panels to move the action along swiftly. Simple Spanish words are nicely integrated into the story as the Barkers learn to communicate with their new brother. Glos. From HORN BOOK Fall 2002, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

PreS.^-Gr. 2. The Barkers are back in a tale of international adoption. When Mama and Papa tell Morgie and Moffie that they are adopting threeyearold Marcos, they explain that the twins can teach him English, as Marcos speaks only Spanish. When he arrives, they overwhelm him with favorite things until Marcos asserts himself and selects his own food, toys, and activities. Accompanied by his favorite conejito (little bunny), Marcos then joins the twins on the playground, teaching them Spanish as they teach him English. With Spanish words woven into the narrative, the bicultural intent of the story is obvious but never didactic. Brimming with dePaola's characteristic charm and clarity, fullpage art and panel illustrations move the tale along visually. In addition to being an upbeat portrayal of international adoption, this is also a subtle lesson in diplomacy for any age. --Linda Perkins


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-In this latest story about the Barker twins, the canine family expands to include Marcos, an adopted brother. In a text punctuated with Spanish words, dePaola chronicles the adjustments made by Moffie and Morgie as they welcome their new sibling who doesn't speak English. At first the twins overwhelm Marcos but once they start taking their clues from him, they begin to feel more comfortable. While the topic of blended families is one that many children will relate to, this is a slight story. In addition, the illustrations, which range from full page to panels of pastel acrylics, are pleasant but somewhat bland.-Shara Alpern, The Free Library of Philadelphia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

The Barker family (Meet the Barkers: Morgan and Moffat Go to School, 2001) is back, and they're adopting a child. Adoptee Marcos is not an infant-he's already three years old, and siblings Moffat and Morgan are shocked to discover that he speaks only Spanish. The whole family has a lot to learn as the twins somewhat too enthusiastically attempt to show Marcos their favorite toys and food and ask if they can take him to school for show-and-tell. When Marcos is finally asked what he wants to do, it turns out he simply wants to learn some English words and teach his new family some Spanish. The cheerful, clear illustrations, done in transparent acrylic on handmade watercolor paper, convey the warmth of the happy, supportive Barker family and depict items in the family's newfound Spanish vocabulary. While the children's adjustment to the adoption may be a bit unrealistically smooth, their feelings of excitement will be familiar and contagious to readers. A brief glossary of Spanish words is included in the front matter. Focusing more on the challenges of meeting someone who speaks a different language than on adjusting to a new sibling, this latest episode in the Barkers' adventures is a welcome, timely addition to the series. (Picture book. 4-8)