Skip to:ContentBottom
Cover image for American rebels : how the Hancock, Adams, and Quincy families fanned the flames of revolution
American rebels : how the Hancock, Adams, and Quincy families fanned the flames of revolution
Title:
American rebels : how the Hancock, Adams, and Quincy families fanned the flames of revolution
ISBN:
9781250163288
Edition:
First edition.
Physical Description:
viii, 400 pages ; 25 cm
Contents:
Part one: Tinder (1744-1764) -- Prologue: A Village Mourns -- Founding a Village -- The Education of Boys -- Worldly Goods, Heavenly Debates -- The Education of Girls -- Changing Fortunes -- Colonial Enthusiasms -- Part two: Spark (1765-1773) -- The Mobs of Boston -- Warmest Lovers of Liberty -- A Watchful Spirit -- The Arrival of Troops -- Portents of a Comet -- Pressing Forward -- Mayhem and Massacre -- On Trial -- Retreat to Braintree -- Patriots Assemble -- Branching Out -- Anxiety and Apprehensions -- Tea, That Baneful Weed -- Part three: Flame (1774-1776) -- Rocks and Quicksands on Every Side -- Punishment and Indignation -- Grand Object of Their View -- In the Cause of Liberty -- On This Island, This England -- Sharpening Quills and Swords -- Ship in a Storm -- Lexington and Concord -- Clouds over Boston -- The Unhappy Contest -- Complications of Evil and Misfortune -- Surrender of Boston -- Debating Separation -- The Signature of Independence -- Epilogue: Friends to Mankind.
Summary:
"Nina Sankovitch's American Rebels explores, for the first time, the intertwined lives of the Hancock, Quincy, and Adams families, and the role each person played in sparking the American Revolution. Before they were central figures in American history, John Hancock, John Adams, Josiah Quincy Junior, Abigail Smith Adams, and Dorothy Quincy Hancock had forged intimate connections during their childhood in Braintree, Massachusetts. Raised as loyal British subjects who quickly saw the need to rebel, their collaborations against the Crown and Parliament were formed years before the revolution and became stronger during the period of rising taxes and increasing British troop presence in Boston. Together, the families witnessed the horrors of the Boston Massacre, the Battles of Lexington and Concord, and Bunker Hill; the trials and tribulations of the Siege of Boston; meetings of the Continental Congress; transatlantic missions for peace and their abysmal failures; and the final steps that led to the signing of the Declaration of Independence. American Rebels explores how the desire for independence cut across class lines, binding people together as well as dividing them-rebels versus loyalists-as they pursued commonly-held goals of opportunity, liberty, and stability. Nina Sankovitch's new book is a fresh history of our revolution that makes readers look more closely at Massachusetts and the small town of Braintree when they think about the story of America's early years."--
Holds: